Planter's Mansion and Slave Houses, U.S. South, 1859


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Image Reference
HW19-732

Source
Harper's New Monthly Magazine (1859), vol. 19, p. 732; accompanies article by T. Addison Richards, "The Rice Lands of the South" (pp. 721-38). (Copy in Special Collections Department, University of Virginia Library)

Comments
"The inhabitants [of a rice plantation] make a large community of themselves alone. The mansion of the planter with its numerous out-houses, the residence of the overseer, and the long streets of negro cabins, give to a single settlement the aspect of a large and busy village or town . . . . [slave cabins] are usually placed, at suitable intervals, in rows, or double rows, with a wide street between..." (Richards, pp. 730, 732).